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Data Repository


This page shows all 145 data sets currently available in our Data repository

To search for specific data sets, please use the CBSU Bibliography search form


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Working for the future: Parentally deprived Nigerian Children have enhanced working memory ability
Authors:
NWEZE, T., Nwoke, M.B., Nwufo, J.I., Aniekwu, R.I., Lange,F.
Reference:
Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8482
Abstract:
Background: The dominant view based on the deficit model of developmental psychopathology is that early adverse rearing impairs cognition. In contrast, an emerging evolutionary-developmental model argues that individuals exposed to early life stress may have improved cognitive abilities that are adapted to harsh environments. We set out to test this hypothesis by examining cognitive functions in parentally deprived children in Nigeria. Methods: Cognitive performance was compared between 53 deprived children who currently live in institutional homes and foster families and 51 non-deprived control participants. We used a multifaceted neurocognitive test battery for the assessment of inhibition, set shifting, and working memory. Results: Results showed that the deprived and non-deprived group did not significantly differ in their performance on set-shifting and inhibition tasks. Conversely, the deprived group performed significantly better than the non-deprived group in the working memory task. Discussion: We interpret the enhanced working memory ability of the deprived group as a correlate of its ecological relevance. In Nigeria, underprivileged children may need to rely to a larger extent on working memory abilities to attain success through academic work. This study provides further evidence that exposure to early adversity does not necessarily impair cognitive functions but can even enhance it under some conditions and in some domains.
Data available, click to request
Improved motion correction of submillimetre 7T fMRI time series with boundary-based registration (BBR)
Authors:
HUANG, PEI., CARLIN, J.D., HENSON, R.N., CORREIA, M.M.
Reference:
Neuroimage, Volume 210, 15 April 2020, 116542
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8464
URL:
Data available, click to request
Focused Representation of Successive Task Episodes in Frontal and Parietal Cortex
Authors:
Kadohisa, M., Watanabe, K., Kusunoki,M., Buckley, M.JK., DUNCAN, J.D.
Reference:
Cerebral Cortex, bhz202
Year of publication:
2019
CBU number:
8458
URL:
Data available, click to request
Efficiency in Magnocellular Processing: A Common Deficit in Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Authors:
BROWN, A., Peters, J., Parsons, C., Crewther, D. and Crewther, S.
Reference:
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (Sensory Neuroscience)
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8441
Abstract:
Several neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) including Developmental Dyslexia (DD), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), but not Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD), are reported to show deficits in global motion processing. Such behavioral deficits have been linked to a temporal processing deficiency. However, to date, there have been few studies assessing the temporal processing efficiency of the Magnocellular M pathways through temporal modulation. Hence, we measured achromatic flicker fusion thresholds at high and low contrast in nonselective samples of NDDs and neurotypicals (mean age 10, range 7–12 years, n = 71) individually, and group matched, for both chronological age and nonverbal intelligence. Autistic tendencies were also measured using the Autism-Spectrum Quotient questionnaire as high AQ scores have previously been associated with the greater physiological amplitude of M-generated nonlinearities. The NDD participants presented with singular or comorbid combinations of DD, ASD, and ADHD. The results showed that ASD and DD, including those with comorbid ADHD, demonstrated significantly lower flicker fusion thresholds (FFTs) than their matched controls. Participants with a singular diagnosis of ADHD did not differ from controls in the FFTs. Overall, the entire NDD plus control populations showed a significant negative correlation between FFT and AQ scores (r = −0.269, p < 0.02 n = 71). In conclusion, this study presents evidence showing that a temporally inefficient M pathway could be the unifying network at fault across the NDDs and particularly in ASD and DD diagnoses, but not in singular diagnosis of ADHD
Data available, click to request
Apathy is associated with reduced precision of prior beliefs about action outcomes
Authors:
HEZEMANS, F.H., Wolpe, N., ROWE, J.B.
Reference:
Journal of Experimental Psychology: General
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8437
Data available, click to request
Risky decision making and cognitive flexibility among online sports bettors in Nigeria
Authors:
NWEZE, T., Agu, E., Lange, F.
Reference:
International Journal of Psychology
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8434
URL:
Data available, click to request
Alpha rhythms reveal when and where item- and associative memories are retrieved
Authors:
del Carmen Martin-Buro, M., Wimber, M., HENSON, R.N., Staresina, B.P.
Reference:
Journal of Neuroscience
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8432
Data available, click to request
The Development of Academic Achievement and Cognitive Abilities: A Bidirectional Perspective
Authors:
KIEVIT, R., Peng, P.
Reference:
Child Development Perspectives
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8420
Abstract:
Theory Paper
Data for this project is held by an external institution. Please contact the authors to request a copy.
Perception of rhythmic speech is modulated by focal bilateral tACS
Authors:
ZOEFEL, B., Allard, I., Anil, M, DAVIS, M.H.
Reference:
Journal of Cogntiive Neuroscience, 32(2), 226-240
Year of publication:
2019
CBU number:
8418
Data available, click to request
Transdiagnostic associations across communication, cognitive, and behavioural problems in a developmentally at-risk population: a network approach
Authors:
MAREVA, S., HOLMES, J., CALM Team
Reference:
BMC Pediatrics
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8416
Data available, click to request


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