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Our publication database contains 7386 publications dating back to 1943. You can browse some of the most recently added entries below, or you can:

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Recently Added Publications


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A unified model of post-stroke language deficits including discourse production and their neural correlates
Authors:
ALYAHYA, R., HALAI, A., Conroy, P., LAMBON RALPH, M.
Reference:
Brain
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8488
Abstract:
The clinical profiles of people with post-stroke aphasia demonstrate considerable variation in the presentation of symptoms. Recent aphasiological studies have attempted to account for this individual variability using a multivariate data-driven approach (principal component analysis) on an extensive neuropsychological and aphasiological battery, to identify fundamental domains of post-stroke aphasia. These domains mainly reflect phonological, semantic and fluency abilities; however, these studies did not account for variability in response to different forms of connected speech, i.e. discourse genres. In the current study, we initially examined differences in the quantity, diversity and informativeness between three different discourse genres, including a simple descriptive genre and two naturalistic forms of connected speech (storytelling narrative, and procedural discourse). Subsequently, we provided the first quantitative investigation on the multidimensionality of connected speech production at both behavioural and neural levels. Connected speech samples across descriptive, narrative, and procedural discourse genres were collected from 46 patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia and 20 neuro-typical adults. Content analyses conducted on all connected speech samples indicated that performance differed across discourse genres and between groups. Specifically, storytelling narratives provided higher quantities of content words and lexical diversity compared to composite picture description and procedural discourse. The analyses further revealed that, relative to neuro-typical adults, patients with aphasia, both fluent and non-fluent, showed reduction in the quantity of verbal production, lexical diversity, and informativeness across all discourses. Given the differences across the discourses, we submitted the connected speech metrics to principal component analysis alongside an extensive neuropsychological/aphasiological battery that assess a wide range of language and cognitive skills. In contrast to previous research, three unique orthogonal connected speech components were extracted in a unified model, reflecting verbal quantity, verbal quality, and motor speech, alongside four core language and cognitive components: phonological production, semantic processing, phonological recognition, and executive functions. Voxel-wise lesion-symptom mapping using these components provided evidence on the involvement of widespread cortical regions and their white matter connections. Specifically, left frontal regions and their underlying white matter tracts corresponding to the frontal aslant tract and the anterior segment of the arcuate fasciculus were particularly engaged with the quantity and quality of fluent connected speech production while controlling for other co-factors. The neural correlates associated with the other language domains align with existing models on the ventral and dorsal pathways for language processing.
Prevalence and predictive value of ICD-11 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and Complex PTSD diagnoses in children and adolescents exposed to a single-event trauma E 26 Feb 2020, (Accepted/In press) In : Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
Authors:
Elliott, R., McKinnon, A., Dixon, C., Boyle, A., MURPHY, F., Dahm, T., Travers-Hill, E., Mul, C-I., Archibald, S-J., Smith, P., DALGLEISH, T., Meiser-Stedman, R. & HITCHCOCK, C.
Reference:
Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8487
The effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on within- and cross-paradigm transfer following multi-session backward recall training
Authors:
BYRNE, E.M., Ewbank, M., GATHERCOLE, S.E., HOLMES, J.
Reference:
Brain and Cognition
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8486
URL:
Retrieval induces adaptive forgetting of competing memories via cortical pattern suppression
Authors:
Wimber, M., ALINK, A., CHAREST, I., KRIEGSKORTE, N, ANDERSON, M.C.
Reference:
Nature Neuroscience, 18(4):582-589
Year of publication:
2015
CBU number:
8485
URL:
A unified model of post-stroke language deficits including discourse production and their neural correlates
Authors:
ALYAHYA, R., HALAI, A., Conroy, P., LAMBON RALPH, M.
Reference:
Brain
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8484
Abstract:
The clinical profiles of people with post-stroke aphasia demonstrate considerable variation in the presentation of symptoms. Recent aphasiological studies have attempted to account for this individual variability using a multivariate data-driven approach (principal component analysis) on an extensive neuropsychological and aphasiological battery, to identify fundamental domains of post-stroke aphasia. These domains mainly reflect phonological, semantic and fluency abilities; however, these studies did not account for variability in response to different forms of connected speech, i.e. discourse genres. In the current study, we initially examined differences in the quantity, diversity and informativeness between three different discourse genres, including a simple descriptive genre and two naturalistic forms of connected speech (storytelling narrative, and procedural discourse). Subsequently, we provided the first quantitative investigation on the multidimensionality of connected speech production at both behavioural and neural levels. Connected speech samples across descriptive, narrative, and procedural discourse genres were collected from 46 patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia and 20 neuro-typical adults. Content analyses conducted on all connected speech samples indicated that performance differed across discourse genres and between groups. Specifically, storytelling narratives provided higher quantities of content words and lexical diversity compared to composite picture description and procedural discourse. The analyses further revealed that, relative to neuro-typical adults, patients with aphasia, both fluent and non-fluent, showed reduction in the quantity of verbal production, lexical diversity, and informativeness across all discourses. Given the differences across the discourses, we submitted the connected speech metrics to principal component analysis alongside an extensive neuropsychological/aphasiological battery that assess a wide range of language and cognitive skills. In contrast to previous research, three unique orthogonal connected speech components were extracted in a unified model, reflecting verbal quantity, verbal quality, and motor speech, alongside four core language and cognitive components: phonological production, semantic processing, phonological recognition, and executive functions. Voxel-wise lesion-symptom mapping using these components provided evidence on the involvement of widespread cortical regions and their white matter connections. Specifically, left frontal regions and their underlying white matter tracts corresponding to the frontal aslant tract and the anterior segment of the arcuate fasciculus were particularly engaged with the quantity and quality of fluent connected speech production while controlling for other co-factors. The neural correlates associated with the other language domains align with existing models on the ventral and dorsal pathways for language processing.
Crud (Re)defined
Authors:
ORBEN, A., Lakens, D.
Reference:
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8483
Abstract:
The idea that in behavioural research everything correlates with everything else was a niche area of the scientific literature for over half a century. With the increasing availability of large datasets in psychology, and the heightened interest in falsifiability and null results, the ‘crud’ factor has however become more relevant than ever before. It is often referenced by researchers to discount minute – but statistically significant – effects that are deemed too small to be considered meaningful. This review tracks the history of the crud factor and examines how its use in the scientific literature has developed to this day. It highlights a common and deep-seated lack of understanding about what the crud factor is, whether it can be proven to exist or estimated, and how it should be interpreted. This makes the crud factor a convenient tool for psychologists to disregard unwanted results, even though the presence of a crud factor should be a large inconvenience for the discipline. To inspire a concerted effort to take the crud factor more seriously, this review clarifies the definitions of important concepts, highlights current pitfalls and poses questions that need to be addressed to ultimately improve our understanding of the crud factor. Such work will be necessary to develop the crud factor into a useful concept encouraging improved psychological research and theory corroboration practices.
Working for the future: Parentally deprived Nigerian Children have enhanced working memory ability
Authors:
NWEZE, T., Nwoke, M.B., Nwufo, J.I., Aniekwu, R.I., Lange,F.
Reference:
Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8482
Abstract:
Background: The dominant view based on the deficit model of developmental psychopathology is that early adverse rearing impairs cognition. In contrast, an emerging evolutionary-developmental model argues that individuals exposed to early life stress may have improved cognitive abilities that are adapted to harsh environments. We set out to test this hypothesis by examining cognitive functions in parentally deprived children in Nigeria. Methods: Cognitive performance was compared between 53 deprived children who currently live in institutional homes and foster families and 51 non-deprived control participants. We used a multifaceted neurocognitive test battery for the assessment of inhibition, set shifting, and working memory. Results: Results showed that the deprived and non-deprived group did not significantly differ in their performance on set-shifting and inhibition tasks. Conversely, the deprived group performed significantly better than the non-deprived group in the working memory task. Discussion: We interpret the enhanced working memory ability of the deprived group as a correlate of its ecological relevance. In Nigeria, underprivileged children may need to rely to a larger extent on working memory abilities to attain success through academic work. This study provides further evidence that exposure to early adversity does not necessarily impair cognitive functions but can even enhance it under some conditions and in some domains.
Data available, click to request
The Sisyphean Cycle of Technology Panics
Authors:
ORBEN, A.
Reference:
Perspectives on Psychological Science
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8480
Abstract:
Widespread concerns about new technologies – whether they be novels, radios or smartphones – are repeatedly found throughout history. While past panics are often met with amusement today, current concerns routinely engender large research investments and policy debate. What we learn from studying past technological panics, however, is that these investments are often inefficient and ineffective. What causes technological panics to repeatedly reincarnate? And why does research routinely fail to address them? To answer such questions, this article examines the network of political, population and academic factors driving the Sisyphean Cycle of Technology Panics. In this cycle, psychologists are encouraged to spend time investigating new technologies, and how they affect children and young people, to calm a worried population. Their endeavour is however rendered ineffective due to a lacking theoretical baseline; researchers cannot build on what has been learnt researching past technologies of concern. Thus academic study seemingly restarts for each new technology of interest, slowing down the policy interventions necessary to ensure technologies are benefitting society. This article highlights how the Sisyphean Cycle of Technology Panics stymies psychology’s positive role in steering technological change, and highlights the pervasive need for improved research and policy approaches to new technologies.
Immune dysregulation among students exposed to exam stress and its mitigation by mindfulness training: findings from an exploratory randomised trial
Authors:
Turner, L., Galante, J., VAINRE, M., Stochl,J., Dufour, G., Jones, P.B.
Reference:
Scientific Reports
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8479
Authors:
Zeigler-Hill, V., Martinez, J.L., Vrabel, J.K., Ezenwa, M.O., Oraetue, H., NWEZE, T., Andrews, D., Kenny, B
Reference:
Personality and Individual Differences
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8478


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