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Our publication database contains 7447 publications dating back to 1943. You can browse some of the most recently added entries below, or you can:

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Recently Added Publications


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Effect of APOE polymorphism on cognition and brain in the CamCAN cohort
Authors:
HENSON, R.N., Suri, S., Knights, E., ROWE, J., KIEVIT, R., Lyall, D.M., Chan, D., Eising, E., Fisher, S.E.
Reference:
Brain and Neuroscience Advances
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8553
Abstract:
olymorphisms in the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene have been associated with individual differences in cognition, brain structure and brain function. For example, the ε4 allele has been associated with cognitive and brain impairment in old age and increased risk of dementia, while the ε2 allele has been claimed to be neuroprotective. According to the “antagonistic pleiotropy” hypothesis, these polymorphisms have different effects across the lifespan, with ε4 for example postulated to confer benefits on cognitive and brain functions earlier in life. In this Stage 2 of the Registered Report https://osf.io/bufc4, we report the results from the cognitive and brain measures in the CamCAN cohort (www.cam-can.org). We investigated the antagonistic pleiotropy hypothesis by testing for allele-by-age interactions in approximately 600 people across the adult lifespan (18-88 years), on six outcome variables related to cognition, brain structure and brain function (namely fluid intelligence, verbal memory, hippocampal gray matter volume, mean diffusion within white matter, and resting-state connectivity measured by both functional magnetic resonance imaging and magnetoencephalography). We found no evidence to support the antagonistic pleiotropy hypothesis. Indeed, Bayes Factors supported the null hypothesis in all cases, except for the (linear) interaction between age and possession of the ε4 allele on fluid intelligence, for which the evidence for faster decline in older ages was ambiguous. Overall, these pre-registered analyses question the antagonistic pleiotropy of APOE polymorphisms, at least in healthy adults.
Data available, click to request
Only holistic and iterative change will fix digital technology research
Authors:
ORBEN, A., Weinstein, N., Przybylski, A.K.
Reference:
Psychological Inquiry
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8552
Long-term cognitive outcome in adult survivors of an early childhood posterior fossa brain tumour.
Authors:
Wagner, A.P., Carroll, C., White, S.R., Watson, P., Spoudeas, H.A., Hawkins, M.M., Walker, D.A., Clare, I.C.H, Holland, A.J., Ring, H.
Reference:
International Journal of Clinical Oncology, 25(10):1763-1773
Year of publication:
2020
CBU number:
8551
Abstract:
PURPOSE:Posterior fossa brain tumours (PFT) and their treatment in young children are often associated with subsequent cognitive impairment. However, reported follow-up periods rarely exceed 10 years. This study reports very long-term cognitive consequences of surviving an early childhood PFT. METHODS:62 adult survivors of a PFT, ascertained from a national register, diagnosed before 5 years of age, and a sibling control, received a single IQ assessment an average of 32 years (range 18-53) after initial diagnosis, using the Weschler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence. Regression models were fitted to survivor-sibling pair differences on verbal and performance IQ (VIQ and PIQ) scores to investigate whether increasing time between PFT diagnosis and follow-up IQ assessment contributed to survivor-sibling IQ differences. RESULTS:At follow-up, survivors had, on average, VIQ 15 points and PIQ 19 points lower than their siblings. There was no significant effect of time since diagnosis on survivor-sibling VIQ difference. Survivors who received radiotherapy showed no significant effect of time since diagnosis on survivor-sibling PIQ difference. Survivors who did not receive radiotherapy demonstrated a trend for it to reduce. CONCLUSIONS:VIQ and PIQ deficits persist in adulthood, suggesting the effect of a fixed injury imposing on cognitive development, rather than an ongoing pathological process. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS:The findings will help parents and others supporting survivors of an early life PFT to identify and plan for possible cognitive outcomes, and highlight the importance of early interventions to optimize cognitive function during the developmental period.
URL:
Electrophysiological assessment of temporal envelope processing in cochlear implant users
Authors:
Gransier, R., CARLYLON, R.P., Wouters, J.
Reference:
Scientific Reports, 21 Sep 2020, 10(1):15406
Year of publication:
2020
CBU number:
8550
Abstract:
Cochlear-implant (CI) users rely on temporal envelope modulations (TEMs) to understand speech, and clinical outcomes depend on the accuracy with which these TEMs are encoded by the electrically-stimulated neural ensembles. Non-invasive EEG measures of this encoding could help clinicians identify and disable electrodes that evoke poor neural responses so as to improve CI outcomes. However, recording EEG during CI stimulation reveals huge stimulation artifacts that are up to orders of magnitude larger than the neural response. Here we used a custom-built EEG system having an exceptionally high sample rate to accurately measure the artefact, which we then removed using linear interpolation so as to reveal the neural response during continuous electrical stimulation. In ten adult CI users, we measured the 40Hz electrically evoked auditory steady-state response (eASSR) and electrically evoked auditory change complex (eACC) to amplitude-modulated 900-pulses-per-second pulse trains, stimulated in monopolar mode (i.e. the clinical default), and at different modulation depths. We successfully measured artifact-free 40-Hz eASSRs and eACCs. Moreover, we found that the 40-Hz eASSR, in contrast to the eACC, showed substantial responses even at shallow modulation depths. We argue that the 40-Hz eASSR is a clinically feasible objective measure to assess TEM encoding in CI users.
URL:
The Global Brain Health Survey: Development of a Multi-Language Survey of Public Views on Brain Health
Authors:
Budin-Ljøsne1, I., Bodorkos Friedman, B., Suri, S., Solé-Padullés, C., Düzel, S., Christian A. Drevon6,7, William F. C. Baaré., Mowinckel, A.M., Zsoldos, E., Madsen, K.S., Bruu Carver, R., Ghisletta, B., Arnesen, M.R., Faz, D.B., Brandmaier, A.M., Fjell, A.M., Kvalbein, A., HENSON, R.N., KIEVIT, R., Nawijn, L., Pochet, R., Schnitzler, A., Walhovd, K.B., and Zasiekina, L.
Reference:
Frontiers in Public Health, 14 Aug 2020, 8:387
Year of publication:
2020
CBU number:
8549
Abstract:
Background: Brain health is a multi-faceted concept used to describe brain physiology, cognitive function, mental health and well-being. Diseases of the brain account for one third of the global burden of disease and are becoming more prevalent as populations age. Diet, social interaction as well as physical and cognitive activity are lifestyle factors that can potentially influence facets of brain health. Yet, there is limited knowledge about the population’s awareness of brain health and willingness to change lifestyle to maintain a healthy brain. This paper introduces the Global Brain Health Survey protocol, designed to assess people’s perceptions of brain health and factors influencing brain health. Methods: The Global Brain Health Survey is an anonymous online questionnaire available in 14 languages to anyone above the age of 18 years. Questions focus on (1) willingness and motivation to maintain or improve brain health, (2) interest in learning more about individual brain health using standardized tests, and (3) interest in receiving individualized support to take care of own brain health. The survey questions were developed based on results from a qualitative interview study investigating brain health perceptions among participants in brain research studies. The survey includes 28 questions and takes 15–20 min to complete. Participants provide electronically informed consent prior to participation. The current survey wave was launched on June 4, 2019 and will close on August 31, 2020. We will provide descriptive statistics of samples distributions including analyses of differences as a function of age, gender, education, country of residence, and we will examine associations between items. The European Union funded Lifebrain project leads the survey in collaboration with national brain councils in Norway, Germany, and Belgium, Brain Foundations in the Netherlands and Sweden, the National University of Ostroh Academy and the Women’s Brain Project. Discussion: Results from this survey will provide new insights in peoples’ views on brain health, in particular, the extent to which the adoption of positive behaviors can be encouraged. The results will contribute to the development of policy recommendations for supporting population brain health, including measures tailored to individual needs, knowledge, motivations and life situations.
URL:
Self-reported sleep relates to hippocampal atrophy across the adult lifespan: results from the Lifebrain consortium
Authors:
Fjell, A.M., Sørensen, Ø, Amlien, I, Bartrés-Faz, D., Bros, D.M., Buchmann, N., Demuth, I., Drevon, C.A., Düzel, S., Ebmeier, K.P., Idland, A.V., Kietzmann, T.C., KIEVIT, R., Kühn, S., Lindenberger, U., Mowinckel, A.M., Nyberg, L., PricE, D., Sexton. C.E., Solé-Padullés, C., Pudas, S., Sederevicius, D., Suri, S., Wagner, G., Watne, L.O., Westerhausen, R., Zsoldos, E., Walhovd, K.B.
Reference:
01 May 2020, 43(5)
Year of publication:
2020
CBU number:
8548
Abstract:
Objectives: Poor sleep is associated with multiple age-related neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions. The hippocampus plays a special role in sleep and sleep-dependent cognition, and accelerated hippocampal atrophy is typically seen with higher age. Hence, it is critical to establish how the relationship between sleep and hippocampal volume loss unfolds across the adult lifespan. Methods: Self-reported sleep measures and MRI-derived hippocampal volumes were obtained from 3105 cognitively normal participants (18–90 years) from major European brain studies in the Lifebrain consortium. Hippocampal volume change was estimated from 5116 MRIs from 1299 participants for whom longitudinal MRIs were available, followed up to 11 years with a mean interval of 3.3 years. Cross-sectional analyses were repeated in a sample of 21,390 participants from the UK Biobank. Results: No cross-sectional sleep—hippocampal volume relationships were found. However, worse sleep quality, efficiency, problems, and daytime tiredness were related to greater hippocampal volume loss over time, with high scorers showing 0.22% greater annual loss than low scorers. The relationship between sleep and hippocampal atrophy did not vary across age. Simulations showed that the observed longitudinal effects were too small to be detected as age-interactions in the cross-sectional analyses. Conclusions: Worse self-reported sleep is associated with higher rates of hippocampal volume decline across the adult lifespan. This suggests that sleep is relevant to understand individual differences in hippocampal atrophy, but limited effect sizes call for cautious interpretation.
URL:
Credit assignment to state-independent task representations and its relationship with model-based decision making
Authors:
Shahara, N., Morana, R., Hausera, T.U., KIVIET, R.A., McNameea, D., Moutoussisa, M., NSPN Consortium, and Dolan, R.J.
Reference:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 116(32) 15871-15876
Year of publication:
2020
CBU number:
8547
Abstract:
Model-free learning enables an agent to make better decisions based on prior experience while representing only minimal knowledge about an environment’s structure. It is generally assumed that model-free state representations are based on outcome-relevant features of the environment. Here, we challenge this assumption by providing evidence that a putative model-free system assigns credit to task representations that are irrelevant to an outcome. We examined data from 769 individuals performing a well-described 2-step reward decision task where stimulus identity but not spatial-motor aspects of the task predicted reward. We show that participants assigned value to spatial-motor representations despite it being outcome irrelevant. Strikingly, spatial-motor value associations affected behavior across all outcome-relevant features and stages of the task, consistent with credit assignment to low-level state-independent task representations. Individual difference analyses suggested that the impact of spatial-motor value formation was attenuated for individuals who showed greater deployment of goal-directed (model-based) strategies. Our findings highlight a need for a reconsideration of how model-free representations are formed and regulated according to the structure of the environment.
URL:
Microglial activation and tau burden predict cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease
Authors:
Malpetti, M., KIEVIT, R.A., Passamonti, L., Jones, S., Tsvetanov, K.A., Rittman, T., Mak, E., Nicastro, N, Bevan-Jones, R., Su, L., Hong, Y.T., Fryer, T.D., Aigbirhio, F.I., O’Brien, J.T., and ROWE, J.B.
Reference:
Brain, 143(5):1588-1602
Year of publication:
2020
CBU number:
8546
URL:
Compulsivity is linked to reduced adolescent development of goal-directed control and fronto-striatal functional connectivity
Authors:
Bullmore, E., Vaghi, M., Moutoussis, M., Vasa, F., KIEVIT, R, Hauser, T., Vertes, P., Shahar, N., Romero-Garcia, R., Kitzbichler, M. et al.
Reference:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8545
Abstract:
A characteristic of much adaptive behavior is its goal-directed nature. An ability to act in a goal-directed manner is progressively refined during development, but this refinement can be impacted by the emergence of psychiatric disorder. Disorders of compulsivity have been framed computationally as a deficit in model-based control, and have been linked also to abnormal fronto-striatal connectivity. However, the developmental trajectory of model-based control, including an interplay between its maturation and an emergence of compulsivity, has not been characterized. Availing of a large sample of healthy adolescents (N=569) aged 14-24 years, we show behaviorally that over the course of adolescence there is a within-person increase in model-based control, and this is more pronounced in younger participants. Using a bivariate latent change score model, we provide evidence that the presence of higher compulsivity traits is associated with an atypical profile of this developmental maturation in model-based control. Resting-state fMRI data, from a subset of the behaviorally assessed sample (N=230), revealed compulsivity is associated with a less pronounced change of within-subject developmental remodelling of functional connectivity, specifically between striatum and a frontoparietal network. Thus, in an otherwise clinically healthy population sample, in early development, individual differences in compulsivity are linked to the developmental trajectory of model-based control and a remodelling of fronto-striatal connectivity.
Exploratory factor analysis with structured residuals for brain network data
Authors:
Van Kesteren, E-J. & Kievit, R.
Reference:
Network Neuroscience
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8544
Abstract:
Dimension reduction is widely used and often necessary to make network analyses and their interpretation tractable by reducing high dimensional data to a small number of underlying variables. Techniques such as Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) are used by neuroscientists to reduce measurements from a large number of brain regions to a tractable number of factors. However, dimension reduction often ignores relevant a priori knowledge about the structure of the data. For example, it is well established that the brain is highly symmetric. In this paper, we (a) show the adverse consequences of ignoring a priori structure in factor analysis, (b) propose a technique to accommodate structure in EFA using structured residuals (EFAST), and (c) apply this technique to three large and varied brain imaging network datasets, demonstrating the superior fit and interpretability of our approach. We provide an R software package to enable researchers to apply EFAST to other suitable datasets.
URL:
Data available, click to request


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