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Our publication database contains 7245 publications dating back to 1943. You can browse some of the most recently added entries below, or you can:

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Recently Added Publications


Showing page of 10


Can short-term memory be trained?
Authors:
NORRIS, D., HALL, J., GATHERCOLE, S.
Reference:
Memory & Cognition
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8346
URL:
The cingulum as a marker of individual differences in neurocognitive development
Authors:
BATHELT, J., ZHANG, Z., JOHNSON, A., ASTLE, D.
Reference:
Scientific Reports
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8345
Data for this project is held by an external institution. Please contact the authors to request a copy.
Sticks, Stones and the Origins of Sapience
Authors:
BARNARD, P.J.
Reference:
In Squeezing Minds from Stones: Cognitive Archaeology and the Evolution of the Human Mind, Frederick L. Coolidge and Karenleigh A. Overmann (eds.). New York: Oxford University Press
Year of publication:
2019
CBU number:
8344
Abstract:
While sticks and stones have broken countless bones and helped provision thousands of generations of hominins, patterns underlying tool making and use may have had profounder consequences. This chapter explores the conjecture that tool use helped lay the foundations of key properties of modern minds: our propositional meaning system; wisdom and intuitions about meanings with their ineffable qualities and links to emotion; and our ability to walk, talk and think about meanings at the same time. We need to react to similar things with similar thoughts and behaviours (generalisation) while reacting to different things with different thoughts and behaviours. Differentiation within the behavioural systems of our precursor species (actions and vocalisations within their physical and social worlds) must have advanced in tandem with differentiation of their mental and neural systems. Tool use clearly contributed to that differentiation. Such differentiation creates new challenges for grasping what mental states underpinning perception, the control of vocal and physical actions, and bodily reactions all have in common. The emergence of two meaning systems in a specific architectural arrangement (Barnard & Teasdale 1991) is one plausible evolutionary response to those challenges that can account for how we think about meaningful abstractions, innovate and multitask.
'Paying Attention to Meanings in the Psychological Sciences and the Performing Arts'.
Authors:
BARNARD, P.J.
Reference:
in Performing Psychologies: Imagination, Creativity and Dramas of the Mind. N. Shaughnessy, & P. Barnard (eds). London: Methuen. pp. 41-66.
Year of publication:
2019
CBU number:
8343
Abstract:
This chapter outlines the Interacting Cognitive Subsystems framework for readers with a background in the humanities. Readers are initially invited to think about how a basic mammal attends and acts in response to simple multimodal states of the world before the approach is extended to habitual creative thinking in the human mind. The main body of the chapter strand describes the idea of “an attentional score” and how this relates to multi-modally derived forms of meaning. This concept arose after more than a decade of collaboration between cognitive scientists and a prominent London-based contemporary dance company. The chapter describes the development of the idea applied to skills in dance creation and performance. Once established, the idea was readily extensible back into the clinical domain to which the Interacting Cognitive Subsystems theory had already been extensively applied. It furnishes a clear case study of how interdisciplinary synergies and benefits can emerge out of extended collaborative research between creative and scientific processes. An attentional score can be used to help think both about studio-based creativity in the performing arts as well as scaffolding accounts of how psychologists work with meanings and attention in various mental health conditions.
Changing Minds and Minding the Gap: Interactions between Arts, Science and Performance
Authors:
Shaughnessy, N & BARNARD, P.
Reference:
In Performing Psychologies: Imagination, Creativity and Dramas of the Mind. N. Shaughnessy, & P. Barnard (eds). London: Methuen. pp. 3-20
Year of publication:
2019
CBU number:
8342
Abstract:
This is an editorial introduction to the book. It sets the context for ten chapters that take wide ranging perspectives on minds and meaning making. It discusses various ways in which interactions between performance and science can complement, interact with and enrich our understanding of the embodied mind, while also having the capacity to change our thinking and perception through experience and action. It ventures into new areas of knowledge creation and practice through interdisciplinary projects as well as addressing some of the many challenges that need to be faced when different communities of practice seek to work together productively.
Performing Psychologies: Imagination, Creativity and Dramas of the Mind
Authors:
Shaughnessy, N. and BARNARD, P.
Reference:
Book - London: Methuen Drama.
Year of publication:
2019
CBU number:
8341
Abstract:
This book offers several perspectives on arts and health, focussing on the different ways in which performance interacting with psychology can enhance understanding of the mind. The book challenges stereotypes of disability, madness and creativity, addressing a range of conditions (autism, dementia and schizophrenia) and performance practices including staged productions and applied work in custodial, health and community settings. Featuring case studies ranging from Hamlet to The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, the pioneering work of companies such as Spare Tyre and Ridiculusmus, and embracing dance and music as well as theatre and drama, the volume offers new perspectives on the dynamic interactions between performance, psychology and states of mind. It contains contributions from psychologists, performance scholars, therapists and healthcare professionals, who offer multiple perspectives on working through performance-based media.
'Seeing the 'Choreographic Mind': three analytic lenses developed to probe and notate creative processes in dance'.
Authors:
deLahunta, S., BARNARD, P.
Reference:
in: The Neurocognition of Dance, 2nd edition. Eds. Blaesing, B., Puttke, M., Schack, T. London: Taylor & Francis, pp 88-114.
Year of publication:
2018
CBU number:
8340
Abstract:
This chapter seeks to use analytic lenses to help frame the questions and enable conversation amongst science and arts practitioners. Scholars and scientists working in a wide range of disciplines have debated issues associated with creative thinking from numerous perspectives. The chapter summarises and exemplifies the nature, uses and potential value of various lenses. The first lens, Process Model, was designed to capture the constituent activities of making and their time course. The second lens, Bridging Model, highlighted the representations and ideational processes that underpin creative design. The third lens, Process and Concept Tracking, was developed as a methodology to enable us to probe deeper into the creative thinking, in situ, during development and across the making, in study of works by one prominent choreographer. Wayne McGregor is a London-based contemporary choreographer whose working methods have drawn inspiration from dance artists such as Merce Cunningham, Trisha Brown and William Forsythe.
Intersecting shapes in music and in dance.
Authors:
BARNARD, P.J. and deLahunta, S.
Reference:
In: Music and Shape. Editors: D. Leech-Wilkinson and H. Prior. Oxford, Publisher: Oxford University Press. pp. 328-350.
Year of publication:
2017
CBU number:
8339
Abstract:
The idea of shape figures widely in discourse about both dance and music. This chapter focuses on how shared understandings might facilitate developments of theory and practice. It first examines the nature of ambiguities that underlie references to the idea of shape. Those ambiguities create problems when we come to address the issue of how music influences the way dance is created and performed. The chapter draws on two analytic lenses explored over ten years of cumulative, interdisciplinary collaboration within R-Research, a team working alongside the contemporary dance company Wayne McGregor | Random Dance. These two lenses were extended in that context to help locate issues, clarify problems and situate what we can learn from choreographic practice and empirical studies of dance. The first lens is a framework for describing what goes on in the making of an artwork or design processes in general. The second lens is that of mental architecture applied here to examine how the multiple components of the human mind work together in creative and performance contexts. Each of these can provide some insight into the multiple facets of choreo-musical relationships and, in doing so can offer some modest augmentations to choreographic practice.
Toward a Richer Theoretical Scaffolding for Interpreting Archaeological Evidence Concerning Cognitive Evolution
Authors:
BARNARD, P. Davidson, I. & Byrne, R.W.
Reference:
In T. Wynn & F. Coolidge (eds.) Cognitive Models in Palaeolithic Archaeology, New York: Oxford University Press. 45-67.
Year of publication:
2016
CBU number:
8338
Abstract:
Book Chapter
Feature coding dataset for trained and untrained working memory tasks in randomized controlled trials of working memory training.
Authors:
GATHERCOLE, S.E., DUNNING, D.L., HOLMES, J., NORRIS, D.G.
Reference:
Data in Brief, 21, 2129-2133
Year of publication:
2018
CBU number:
8337
URL:


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