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Data Repository


This page shows all 246 data sets currently available in our Data repository

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Lesion site and therapy time predict responses to a therapy for anomia after stroke: a prognostic model development study
Authors:
Hope, T., NARDO, D., Holland, R., Ondobaka, S., Akkad, H., Price, C,. Leff, A., Crinion, J.
Reference:
Scientific Reports, 11, 18572
Year of publication:
2021
CBU number:
8742
Abstract:
Stroke is a leading cause of disability, and language impairments (aphasia) after stroke are both common and particularly feared. Most stroke survivors with aphasia exhibit anomia (difficulties with naming common objects), but while many therapeutic interventions for anomia have been proposed, treatment effects are typically much larger in some patients than others. Here, we asked whether that variation might be more systematic, and even predictable, than previously thought. 18 patients, each at least 6 months after left hemisphere stroke, engaged in a computerised treatment for their anomia over a 6-week period. Using only: (a) the patients’ initial accuracy when naming (to-be) trained items; (b) the hours of therapy that they devoted to the therapy; and (c) whole-brain lesion location data, derived from structural MRI; we developed Partial Least Squares regression models to predict the patients’ improvements on treated items, and tested them in cross-validation. Somewhat surprisingly, the best model included only lesion location data and the hours of therapy undertaken. In cross-validation, this model significantly out-performed the null model, in which the prediction for each patient was simply the mean treatment effect of the group. This model also made promisingly accurate predictions in absolute terms: the correlation between empirical and predicted treatment response was 0.62 (95% CI 0.27, 0.95). Our results indicate that individuals’ variation in response to anomia treatment are, at least somewhat, systematic and predictable, from the interaction between where and how much lesion damage they have suffered, and the time they devoted to the therapy.
URL:
Data available, click to request
Does Hemispheric Asymmetry Reduction in Older Adults (HAROLD) in motor cortex reflect compensation?
Authors:
KNIGHTS, E., Morcom, A., HENSON, R.N.
Reference:
Journal of Neuroscience
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8741
Abstract:
Older adults tend to display greater brain activation in the non-dominant hemisphere during even basic sensorimotor responses. It is debated whether this Hemispheric Asymmetry Reduction in Older Adults (HAROLD) reflects a compensatory mechanism. Across two independent fMRI experiments involving adult-lifespan human samples (N = 586 and N = 81; approximately half female) who performed right hand finger responses, we distinguished between these hypotheses using behavioural and multivariate Bayes (MVB) decoding approaches. Standard univariate analyses replicated a HAROLD pattern in motor cortex, but in- and out-of-scanner behavioural results both demonstrated evidence against a compensatory relationship, in that reaction time measures of task performance in older adults did not relate to ipsilateral motor activity. Likewise, MVB showed that this increased ipsilateral activity in older adults did not carry additional information, and if anything, combining ipsilateral with contralateral activity patterns reduced action decoding in older adults (at least in Experiment 1). These results contradict the hypothesis that HAROLD is compensatory, and instead suggest that the age-related, ipsilateral hyper-activation is non-specific, in line with alternative hypotheses about age-related reductions in neural efficiency/differentiation or inter-hemispheric inhibition. Analysis scripts: https://github.com/ethanknights/HAROLD-MVB Behavioural & extracted-ROI datasets: https://osf.io/seuz5/
Data available, click to request
Evidence for a pervasive autobiographical memory impairment in Logopenic Progressive Aphasia
Authors:
RAMANAN, S., Foxe, D., El-Omar, H., Ahmed, R.M., Hodges, J.R., Piguet, O., Irish, M.
Reference:
Neurobiology of Aging
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8739
Abstract:
Although characterized primarily as a language disorder, mounting evidence indicates episodic amnesia in Logopenic Progressive Aphasia (LPA). Whether such memory disturbances extend to information encoded pre-disease onset remains unclear. To address this question, we examined autobiographical memory in 10 LPA patients, contrasted with 18 typical amnestic Alzheimer’s disease and 16 healthy Control participants. A validated assessment, the Autobiographical Interview, was employed to explore autobiographical memory performance across the lifespan under free and probed recall conditions. Relative to Controls, LPA patients showed global impairments across all time periods for free recall, scoring at the same level as disease-matched cases of Alzheimer’s Disease. Importantly, these retrieval deficits persisted in LPA, even when structured probing was provided, and could not be explained by overall level of language disruption or amount of information generated during autobiographical narration. Autobiographical memory impairments in LPA related to grey matter intensity decrease in predominantly posterior parietal brain regions implicated in memory retrieval. Together, our results suggest that episodic memory disturbances may be an under-appreciated clinical feature of LPA.
Data for this project is held by an external institution. Please contact the authors to request a copy.
Education and Income Show Heterogeneous Relationships to Lifespan Brain and Cognitive Differences Across European and US Cohorts
Authors:
Walhovd, K.B., Fjell, A.M., Wang, Y., Amlien, I.K., Mowinckel, A.M., Lindenberger, U., Düzel, S., Bartrés-Faz, D., Ebmeier, K.P., Drevon, K.A., Baaré, W.F.C., Ghisletta, P., Baruël Johansen, L., KIEVIT, R.A., HENSON, R.N., Madsen, K.S., Nyberg, L., Harris, J.R., Solé-Padullés, C., Pudas, S., Sørensen, O., Westerhausen, R., Zsoldos, E., Nawijn, L., Lyngstad, T.H., Suri, S., Penninx, B., Rogeberg, O.J., Brandmaier, A.M.
Reference:
Cerebral Cortex
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8738
Abstract:
Higher socio-economic status (SES) has been proposed to have facilitating and protective effects on brain and cognition. We ask whether relationships between SES, brain volumes and cognitive ability differ across cohorts, by age and national origin. European and US cohorts covering the lifespan were studied (4–97 years, N = 500 000; 54 000 w/brain imaging). There was substantial heterogeneity across cohorts for all associations. Education was positively related to intracranial (ICV) and total gray matter (GM) volume. Income was related to ICV, but not GM. We did not observe reliable differences in associations as a function of age. SES was more strongly related to brain and cognition in US than European cohorts. Sample representativity varies, and this study cannot identify mechanisms underlying differences in associations across cohorts. Differences in neuroanatomical volumes partially explained SES–cognition relationships. SES was more strongly related to ICV than to GM, implying that SES–cognition relations in adulthood are less likely grounded in neuroprotective effects on GM volume in aging. The relatively stronger SES–ICV associations rather are compatible with SES–brain volume relationships being established early in life, as ICV stabilizes in childhood. The findings underscore that SES has no uniform association with, or impact on, brain and cognition.
URL:
Data for this project is held by an external institution. Please contact the authors to request a copy.
Ageing and the Ipsilateral M1 BOLD Response: A Connectivity Study
Authors:
Tak, Y.W., KNIGHTS, E., HENSON, R., Zeidman, P.
Reference:
Brain Sciences, 11(9), 10.3390/brainsci11091130
Year of publication:
2021
CBU number:
8737
Abstract:
Young people exhibit a negative BOLD response in ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1) when making unilateral movements, such as button presses. This negative BOLD response becomes more positive as people age. In this study, we investigated why this occurs, in terms of the underlying effective connectivity and haemodynamics. We applied dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to task fMRI data from 635 participants aged 18–88 from the Cam-CAN dataset, who performed a cued button pressing task with their right hand. We found that connectivity from contralateral supplementary motor area (SMA) and dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) to ipsilateral M1 became more positive with age, explaining 44% of the variability across people in ipsilateral M1 responses. In contrast, connectivity from contralateral M1 to ipsilateral M1 was weaker and did not correlate with individual differences in rM1 BOLD. Neurovascular and haemodynamic parameters in the model were not able to explain the age-related shift to positive BOLD. Our results add to a body of evidence implicating neural, rather than vascular factors as the predominant cause of negative BOLD—while emphasising the importance of inter-hemispheric connectivity. This study provides a foundation for investigating the clinical and lifestyle factors that determine the sign and amplitude of the M1 BOLD response in ageing, which could serve as a proxy for neural and vascular health, via the underlying neurovascular mechanisms Analysis scripts: https://github.com/ethanknights/HAROLD-MVB Behavioural & extracted-ROI datasets: https://osf.io/seuz5/
URL:
Data available, click to request
Imaging Brain Glx Dynamics in Response to Pressure Pain Stimulation: A 1H-fMRS Study.
Authors:
Jelen, L.A., Lythgoe, D.J., JACKSON, J.B., Howard, M.A., Stone, J.M., Egerton, A.
Reference:
Frontiers in Psychiatry: Neuroimaging and Stimulation, 12: 681419
Year of publication:
2021
CBU number:
8727
Abstract:
Glutamate signalling is increasingly implicated across a range of psychiatric, neurological and pain disorders. Reliable methodologies are needed to probe the glutamate system and understand glutamate dynamics in vivo. Functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-fMRS) is a technique that allows measurement of glutamatergic metabolites over time in response to task conditions including painful stimuli. In this study, 18 healthy volunteers underwent 1H-fMRS during a pressure-pain paradigm (8 blocks of REST and 8 blocks of PAIN) across two separate sessions. During each session, estimates of glutamate + glutamine (Glx), scaled to total creatine (tCr = creatine + phosphocreatine) were determined for averaged REST and PAIN conditions within two separate regions of interest: the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and dorsal ACC (dACC). A two-way repeated measures analysis of variance determined a significant main effect of CONDITION (p = 0.025), with higher Glx/tCr during PAIN compared to REST across combined sessions, in the dACC ROI only. However, increases in dACC Glx/tCr during PAIN compared to REST showed limited reliability and reproducibility across sessions. Future test-retest 1H-fMRS studies should examine modified or alternative paradigms to determine more reliable methodologies to challenge the glutamate system that may then be applied in patient groups and experimental medicine studies.
URL:
Data for this project is held by an external institution. Please contact the authors to request a copy.
Grip strength from midlife as an indicator of later-life brain health and cognition: Evidence from a British birth cohort
Authors:
DERCON, Q., Nicholas, J.M., James, S-N., Schott, J.M., Richards, M.
Reference:
BMC Geriatrics, 01 Jan 2021, 21(1)
Year of publication:
2021
CBU number:
8726
Abstract:
Background: Grip strength is an indicator of physical function with potential predictive value for health in ageing populations. We assessed whether trends in grip strength from midlife predicted later-life brain health and cognition. Methods: 446 participants in an ongoing British birth cohort study, the National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD), had their maximum grip strength measured at ages 53, 60-64, and 69, and subsequently underwent neuroimaging as part of a neuroscience sub-study, referred to as “Insight 46”, at age 69-71. A group-based trajectory model identified latent groups of individuals in the whole NSHD cohort with below- or above-average grip strength over time, plus a reference group. Group assignment, plus standardised grip strength levels and change from midlife were each related to measures of whole-brain volume (WBV) and white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHV), plus several cognitive tests. Models were adjusted for sex, body size, head size (where appropriate), sociodemographics, and behavioural and vascular risk factors. Results: Lower grip strength from midlife was associated with smaller WBV and lower matrix reasoning scores at age 69-71, with findings consistent between analysis of individual time points and analysis of trajectory groups. There was little evidence of an association between grip strength and other cognitive test scores. Although greater declines in grip strength showed a weak association with higher WMHV at age 69-71, trends in the opposite direction were seen at individual time points with higher grip strength at ages 60-64, and 69 associated with higher WMHV. Conclusions: This study provides preliminary evidence that maximum grip strength may have value in predicting brain health. Future work should assess to what extent age-related declines in grip strength from midlife reflect concurrent changes in brain structure.
URL:
Data for this project is held by an external institution. Please contact the authors to request a copy.
Face-selective responses in combined EEG/MEG recordings with fast periodic visual stimulation (FPVS)
Authors:
HAUK, O., RICE, G., Volfart,a., MAGNABOSCOA, F., LAMBON RALPH, M.A., Rossion, B.
Reference:
NeuroImage, 242, 118460
Year of publication:
2021
CBU number:
8724
Abstract:
Fast periodic visual stimulation (FPVS) allows the recording of objective brain responses of human face categorization (i.e., generalizable face-selective responses) with high signal-to-noise ratio. This approach has been successfully employed in a number of scalp electroencephalography (EEG) studies but has not been used with magnetoencephalography (MEG) yet, let alone with combined MEG/EEG recordings and distributed source estimation. Here, we presented various natural images of faces periodically (1.2 Hz) among natural images of objects (base frequency 6 Hz) whilst recording simultaneous EEG and MEG in 15 participants. Both measurement modalities showed face-selective responses at 1.2 Hz and harmonics across participants, with high and comparable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in about 3 min of stimulation. The correlation of face categorization responses between EEG and two MEG sensor types was lower than between the two MEG sensor types, indicating that the two sensor modalities provide independent information about the sources of face-selective responses. Face-selective EEG responses were right-lateralized as reported previously, and were numerically but non-significantly rightlateralized in MEG data. Distributed source estimation based on combined EEG/MEG signals confirmed a more bilateral face-selective response in visual brain regions located anteriorly to the common response to all stimuli at 6 Hz and harmonics. Conventional sensor and source space analyses of evoked responses in the time domain further corroborated this result. Our results demonstrate that FPVS in combination with simultaneously recorded EEG and MEG may serve as an efficient localizer paradigm for human face categorization.
URL:
Data available, click to request
Assessing the landscape of STXBP1-related disorders in 534 individuals
Authors:
Xian, J., Parthasarathy, S., McKeown, S., Balagura, G., Fitch, E., Helbig, K., Gan, J., Ganesan, S., Kaufman, M.C., Ellis, C.A., Lewis-Smith, D., Galer, P., Cunningham, K., O’Brien, M., Cosico, M., BAKER, K., Darling, A., Veiga de Goes, F., El Achkar, C.M., Doering, J.H., Furia, F., García-Cazorla, A., Gardella, E., Geertjens, L., Klein, C., KOLEESNIK-TAYLOR, A., Lammertse, H., Lee, J., Mackie, A., Misra-Isrie, M., Olson, H., Sexton, E., Sheidley, B., Smith, L., Sotero, L., Stamberger, H., Syrbe, S., Thalwitzer, K.M., van Berkel, A., van Haelst, M., Yuskaitis, C. Weckhuysen, S., Prosser, B., Rigby, C.S., Demarest, S., Pierce, S., Zhang, Y., Steensbjerre Møller, R., Bruining, H., Poduri, A., Zara, F., Verhage, M., Striano, P., and Helbig, I.,
Reference:
Brain
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8723
Abstract:
Disease-causing variants in STXBP1 are amongst the most common genetic causes of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the phenotypic spectrum and outcomes in STXBP1related disorders are wide, and clear correlations between variant type and clinical features have not been observed so far. Here, we harmonized clinical data across 534 individuals with STXBP1related disorders and analyzed 19 973 derived phenotypic terms, including phenotypes of 253 individuals previously unreported in the scientific literature. The overall phenotypic landscape in STXBP1-related disorders is characterized by neurodevelopmental abnormalities in 95% and seizures in 89% of individuals, including focal-onset seizures as the most common seizure type (47%). More than 88% of individuals with STXBP1-related disorders have seizure onset in the first year of life, including neonatal seizure onset in 47%. Individuals with protein-truncating variants and deletions in STXBP1 (n=261) were almost twice as likely to present with West Syndrome and were more phenotypically similar than expected by chance. Five genetic hotspots with recurrent variants were identified in more than 10 individuals, including p.Arg406Cys/His (n=40), p.Arg292Cys/His/Leu/Pro (n=30), p.Arg551Cys/Gly/His/Leu (n=24), p.Pro139Leu (n=12), and p.Arg190Trp (n=11). None of the recurrent variants were significantly associated with distinct electroclinical syndromes, single phenotypic features, or showed overall clinical similarity, indicating that the baseline variability in STXBP1-related disorders is too high for discrete phenotypic subgroups to emerge. We then reconstructed the seizure history in 62 individuals with STXBP1-related disorders in detail, retrospectively assigning seizure type and seizure frequency monthly across 4 433 time-intervals, and retrieved 251 anti-seizure medication prescriptions from the electronic medical records. We demonstrate a dynamic pattern of seizure control and complex interplay with response to specific medications particularly in the first year of life when seizures in STXBP1-related disorders are the most prominent. Adrenocorticotropic hormone and phenobarbital were more likely to initially reduce seizure frequency in infantile spasms and focal seizures compared to other treatment options, while the ketogenic diet was most effective in maintaining seizure freedom. In summary, we demonstrate how the multidimensional spectrum of phenotypic features in STXBP1-related disorders can be assessed using a computational phenotype framework to facilitate the development of future precision-medicine approaches.
Data for this project is held by an external institution. Please contact the authors to request a copy.
Reward motivation increases univariate activity but has limited effect on coding of task-relevant information across the frontoparietal cortex
Authors:
SHASHIDHARA, S., EREZ, Y.
Reference:
Neuropsycholigia, 160: 167981
Year of publication:
2021
CBU number:
8721
Abstract:
Selection and integration of information based on current goals is fundamental for goal-directed behavior. Reward motivation has been shown to improve behavioral performance, yet the neural mechanisms that link motivation and control processes, and in particular its effect on context-dependent information processing, remain unclear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 24 human volunteers (13 females) to test whether reward motivation enhances the coding of task-relevant information across the frontoparietal cortex, as would be predicted based on previous experimental evidence and theoretical accounts. In a cued target detection task, participants detected whether an object from a cued visual category was present in a subsequent display. The combination of the cue and the object visual category determined the behavioral status of the objects. To manipulate reward motivation, half of all trials offered the possibility of a monetary reward. We observed an increase with reward in overall univariate activity across the frontoparietal control network when the cue and subsequent object were presented. Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) showed that behavioral status information for the objects was conveyed across the network. However, in contrast to our prediction, reward did not increase the discrimination between behavioral status conditions in the stimulus epoch of a trial when object information was processed depending on a current context. In the high-level general-object visual region, the lateral occipital complex, the representation of behavioral status was driven by visual differences and was not modulated by reward. Our study provides useful evidence for the limited effects of reward motivation on task-related neural representations and highlights the necessity to unravel the diverse forms and extent of these effects.
URL:
Data available, click to request


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