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Our publication database contains 7250 publications dating back to 1943. You can browse some of the most recently added entries below, or you can:

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Recently Added Publications


Showing page of 10


Learning from the past and expecting the future in Parkinsonism: Dopaminergic influence on predictions about the timing of future events
Authors:
TOMASSINI, A., Pollak, T.A., Edwards, M.J., Bestmann, S.
Reference:
Neuropsychologia
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8351
Investigating Fast Mapping task components: no evidence for the role of semantic referent nor semantic inference in healthy adults.
Authors:
COOPER, E., GREVE, A., HENSON, R.N.
Reference:
Frontiers in Psychology - Cognition
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8350
Mental imagery as a "motivational amplifier" to promote activities
Authors:
RENNER, F., MURPHY, F., JI, J., MANLY, T., HOLMES, E.
Reference:
Behaviour Research and Therapy
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8349
Preventing a thought from coming to mind elicits increased right frontal beta just as stopping action does
Authors:
Aron, Adam R., Castiglione, A., Wagner, J., ANDERSON, M.
Reference:
Cerebral Cortex
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8348
How do we perform backward serial recall?
Authors:
NORRIS, D., HALL, J,. GATHERCOLE, S.
Reference:
Memory & Cognition
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8347
URL:
Can short-term memory be trained?
Authors:
NORRIS, D., HALL, J., GATHERCOLE, S.
Reference:
Memory & Cognition
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8346
URL:
The cingulum as a marker of individual differences in neurocognitive development
Authors:
BATHELT, J., ZHANG, Z., JOHNSON, A., ASTLE, D.
Reference:
Scientific Reports
Year of publication:
In Press
CBU number:
8345
Data for this project is held by an external institution. Please contact the authors to request a copy.
Sticks, Stones and the Origins of Sapience
Authors:
BARNARD, P.J.
Reference:
In Squeezing Minds from Stones: Cognitive Archaeology and the Evolution of the Human Mind, Frederick L. Coolidge and Karenleigh A. Overmann (eds.). New York: Oxford University Press
Year of publication:
2019
CBU number:
8344
Abstract:
While sticks and stones have broken countless bones and helped provision thousands of generations of hominins, patterns underlying tool making and use may have had profounder consequences. This chapter explores the conjecture that tool use helped lay the foundations of key properties of modern minds: our propositional meaning system; wisdom and intuitions about meanings with their ineffable qualities and links to emotion; and our ability to walk, talk and think about meanings at the same time. We need to react to similar things with similar thoughts and behaviours (generalisation) while reacting to different things with different thoughts and behaviours. Differentiation within the behavioural systems of our precursor species (actions and vocalisations within their physical and social worlds) must have advanced in tandem with differentiation of their mental and neural systems. Tool use clearly contributed to that differentiation. Such differentiation creates new challenges for grasping what mental states underpinning perception, the control of vocal and physical actions, and bodily reactions all have in common. The emergence of two meaning systems in a specific architectural arrangement (Barnard & Teasdale 1991) is one plausible evolutionary response to those challenges that can account for how we think about meaningful abstractions, innovate and multitask.
'Paying Attention to Meanings in the Psychological Sciences and the Performing Arts'.
Authors:
BARNARD, P.J.
Reference:
in Performing Psychologies: Imagination, Creativity and Dramas of the Mind. N. Shaughnessy, & P. Barnard (eds). London: Methuen. pp. 41-66.
Year of publication:
2019
CBU number:
8343
Abstract:
This chapter outlines the Interacting Cognitive Subsystems framework for readers with a background in the humanities. Readers are initially invited to think about how a basic mammal attends and acts in response to simple multimodal states of the world before the approach is extended to habitual creative thinking in the human mind. The main body of the chapter strand describes the idea of “an attentional score” and how this relates to multi-modally derived forms of meaning. This concept arose after more than a decade of collaboration between cognitive scientists and a prominent London-based contemporary dance company. The chapter describes the development of the idea applied to skills in dance creation and performance. Once established, the idea was readily extensible back into the clinical domain to which the Interacting Cognitive Subsystems theory had already been extensively applied. It furnishes a clear case study of how interdisciplinary synergies and benefits can emerge out of extended collaborative research between creative and scientific processes. An attentional score can be used to help think both about studio-based creativity in the performing arts as well as scaffolding accounts of how psychologists work with meanings and attention in various mental health conditions.
Changing Minds and Minding the Gap: Interactions between Arts, Science and Performance
Authors:
Shaughnessy, N & BARNARD, P.
Reference:
In Performing Psychologies: Imagination, Creativity and Dramas of the Mind. N. Shaughnessy, & P. Barnard (eds). London: Methuen. pp. 3-20
Year of publication:
2019
CBU number:
8342
Abstract:
This is an editorial introduction to the book. It sets the context for ten chapters that take wide ranging perspectives on minds and meaning making. It discusses various ways in which interactions between performance and science can complement, interact with and enrich our understanding of the embodied mind, while also having the capacity to change our thinking and perception through experience and action. It ventures into new areas of knowledge creation and practice through interdisciplinary projects as well as addressing some of the many challenges that need to be faced when different communities of practice seek to work together productively.


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